10 Difference Between Tyndall Effect and Brownian Motion with Table

What is the difference between Tyndall effect and Brownian motion?

The behavior of particles in a substance is described by the Tyndall effect and Brownian motion in Chemistry. Tyndall effect can be observed by passing light beams and Brownian motion through a light microscope.

The main difference between the Tyndall effect and Brownian motion is that the former occurs due to the scattering of light by individual particles while the latter due to the random motion of atoms or molecules in a fluid.

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Difference Between Tyndall Effect and Brownian Motion

Comparison Table (Tyndall Effect vs Brownian Motion)

Basic Terms Tyndall Effect Brownian Motion
MeaningIt occurs due to the scattering of light as light beams pass through a colloidal solutionIt is a random movement of particles in a fluid due to their collision with other atoms or molecules
Observation MediumHuman EyeLight Microscope
Discovered byJohn TyndallBotanist Robert Brown
PropertyOptical propertyKinetic property
ConceptLight scattering phenomenonThe random movement of particles by collision
Applicable mediumColloidalLiquid and gases
Factors AffectingWavelengths of light, the density of a colloidal substance, frequency of lightSize of particles, temperature, viscosity, the concentration of particles
Size of the SubstanceFrom 40 to 900nmSmaller diameter
ExamplesMilk solution, Soap solutions, Opalescent glassDiffusion of dust, gases in the air, Diffusion of calcium to bones

What Is Tyndall Effect?

Tyndall effect occurs in colloidal fluids. Light gets scattered due to the presence of colloidal particles in the fluid. The scattering of light can be observed with naked eyes.

But the effect cannot be seen in a true solution. A true solution is a homogenous mixture of two or more substances. The suspension is a heterogeneous mixture containing different substances. Colloids are an intermediate between suspension and true solutions.

The Tyndall effect was discovered by John Tyndall. It provides the easiest way to distinguish between true and colloidal solutions.

Examples of Tyndall effects are the Blue eye color. Factors affecting the Tyndall effect are the frequency of the incident light beam and the density of particles.

What Is Brownian Motion?

Brownian motion is the random movement of particles in a fluid due to collision with other atoms or molecules. The Brownian motion makes the particles appear suspended in the fluid.

The experiment was first discovered by Botanist Robert Brown. Diffusion describes the movement of particles from the higher region to the lower region. But the random movement can be observed under a light microscope.

An example of Brownian motion is the motion of pollen grains on still water. Factors affecting Brownian motion are temperature and concentration.

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Main Difference between Tyndall Effect and Brownian Motion

  1. Tyndall effect is a phenomenon of light scattering by colloidal particles while Brownian motion is the random movement of particles due to collision with other atoms or molecules.
  2. Brownian motion involves the collision of particles while the Tyndall effect involve light scattering
  3. Brownian motion is named after Botanist Robert Brown while Tyndall effect is named after John Tyndall
  4. Tyndall effect occurs in colloidal solutions since particles are large while Brownian motion occurs in gases and liquids.
  5. Tyndall effect of light scattering can be seen with naked eyes while random motion in Brownian motion can be seen under a light microscope
  6. Factors affecting the Tyndall effect are frequency, the wavelength of light, and density of colloidal solutions whereas those of Brownian motion are temperature and concentration.

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In Conclusion

The Brownian motion explains the random movement of particles by collision with other atoms or molecules whereas the Tyndall effect explains the scattering of light by the colloidal solutions of different sizes.

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