9 Difference Between Neutrophils, Eosinophils and Basiophils with Table

What is the difference between neutrophils, eosinophils, and basiophils?

Neutrophils, Eosinophils, and basophils are granulocytes in the blood. Granulocytes are typically white blood cells that offer defense to the body against pathogens like parasites, bacteria, and viruses.

The main difference between neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils are based on their functionalities. Neutrophils engulf bacteria found in the extracellular matrix through phagocytosis.

Eosinophils are involved in the triggering of inflammatory responses in allergic disorders and the anticoagulant.  Basophils contain heparin for preventing quick blood clotting in the body.

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Difference Between Neutrophils, Eosinophils and Basiophils

Comparison Table (Neutrophils vs Eosinophils vs Basiophils)

NeutrophilsEosinophilsBasiophils
Have multi-lobed nucleusHave two-lobed nucleusHave bean-shaped nucleus
Engulf bacteria found in the extracellular matrix through phagocytosisInvolved in the triggering of inflammatory responses in allergic disorders and the anticoagulantContain heparin for preventing quick blood clotting in the body
The lifespan of 5-90 hoursThe lifespan of 8-12 hours of circulationThe lifespan of 60-70 hours
The diameter of 8.85 micrometerThe diameter of about 12-17 micrometerThe diameter of about 10-14 micrometer
Stained in natural pink colorStained in brick-red in acidic stainsStained in dark blue in basic stains
Account for 40-75% of WBCAccount for 1-6% of WBCAccount for 0.5-1% of WBC
The low count is described as neutropenia while high counts are neutrophiliaEosinophilia is when there are more than 500 counts in the bloodBasophilia is a disease associated with basiophils
A normal range is about 2500-8000 per mm3A normal range is up to 0-500 mm3A normal range is up to 0-300 mm3

What Are Neutrophils

Neutrophils are the types of white blood cells. These granulocytes are responsible for engulfing bacteria on the extracellular matrix through phagocytosis.

Phagocytosis is the process where plasma membrane forms a vesicle or phagosome to surround the bacterium in the extracellular matrix.

The vesicle is pinched in the cytoplasm and transformed into a lysosome. The fusion of lysosome and phagosome result in phagolysosomes.

The waste formed during digestion is released by a process known as exocytosis. Keep in mind that neutrophils are the first cells that migrate to the site experiencing inflammation using cytokine signals.

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What Are Eosinophils?

Eosinophils are the second type of white blood cells. These granulocytes are involved in the triggering of inflammatory responses in case of allergic disorders.

It responds to the situation due to chemokine and cytokine signals. It migrates to the inflammatory site and combats the multicellular parasites.

Besides that, these granulocytes help to the destruction of T Cell helpers by activation of Basophils. These cells are found in the thymus, spleen, ovary, uterus, lymph nodes, and lower gastrointestinal tract.

What Are Basiophils?

Basiophils are the last group of white blood cells. These granulocytes contain heparin that prevents quick blood clotting. The enzymes present in these cells are released during asthma.

Basiophils are the least common granulocytes in the blood. But they are the largest granulocytes and can serve as phagocytes.

These granulocytes release serotonin and histamine for inducing inflammation. These cells play a vital role when it comes to fighting a viral infection.

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Main Difference between Neutrophils, Eosinophils, and Basiophils

  1. Neutrophils consist of a multi-lobed nucleus. Eosinophils consist of 2-5 lobed nucleus and basiophils consists of the bean-shaped nucleus.
  2. Neutrophils engulf bacteria found in the extracellular matrix through phagocytosis. Eosinophils are involved in the triggering of inflammatory responses in allergic disorders. Basiophils contain heparin that helps to prevent quick blood clotting.
  3. Neutrophils are stained in natural pink color. Eosinophils are stained in brick-red in acidic stains and Basiophils are stained in dark blue in basic stains.
  4. Normal range for neutrophils is 1,500-8,000 neutrophils mm-3. Normal range for eosinophils is 0-450 eosinophils mm-3. Normal range for basiophils is 0-300 basophils mm-3.
  5. The lifespan of neutrophils is 5-90 hours. The lifespan of eosinophils is 8-12 hours in circulation. The lifespan of basiophils is 60-70 hours.

In Conclusion

Neutrophils, eosinophils, and basiophils are formed during hematopoiesis. These granulocytes are also known as myeloid cells.

These white blood cells circulate in the blood and migrate to the region experiencing inflammation. But the structure and role of these granulocytes in the body of invertebrates are quite different.

Granulocytes are produced in the bone marrow and circulate in the blood to provide defense against bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

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